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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 86 (some duplicates have been removed)
yourselves, a mobster colleagues, a monster elected official so we can -- amongst your colleagues and amongst your elected officials. the speakers and the sponsors are invited to a post the event a luncheon on the second floor. i want to give all of the speakers and sponsors a round of applause. thank you. [applause] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> next, remarks from paul ryan and scott walker. live at 7:00, your calls and comments on "the washington journal." >> one of the key themes for any exhibition on the civil war of the twin issues of abolition and emancipation. we are fortunate they came of age when they did because between the two of them, they make issues around emancipation and abolition, issues around human rights and the american freedom on a general not raise specific level. i will go through every piece of information that johnson puts it to this picture. i will summarize by saying if you pay attention to the top half as well as the bottom half, there is a letter going from the bedroom window up
from that guy. i think they won in a low turn in elections in wisconsin. i think everybody should run now. go into elections where there's a lot of voters so you don't get this weird warped sense of people who supposedly represent the american electorate. that guy doesn't represent anybody. your thoughts. the current secretary of state's performance today against the performance on the side of the right. >> he was so overmatched, ron johnson. he opened questions by saying it could have been taken a very simple phone call to ascertain the truth. my god, did he look at the pictures of that carnage? nothing was very simple. he proved he's very simple. his questions were disrespectful and i was thrilled that she got angry at him. women are sometimes told never to get emotional or angry. she did both. she choked up a bit in her introduction and got angry at ron johnson as she should. she lectured rand paul. on had i been president, you would have been fired. >> to consider the prospect of rand paul. but he's got none. >> he has a healthy imagination. >> you mentioned compassion and feeling
justice, distinguished justices of the court, my fellow statewide elected officials, members of armed forces and national guard, members of the consular corps, governor christine gregoire, and my fellow washingtonians. this we know,our world is changing faster and more dramatically than ever before. once in a lifetime events now seem to happen with startling regularity. we've seen the greatest financial crisis since the great depression, natural disasters fueled by climate change, and unimaginable human tragedies like sandy hook elementary. technology, medicine, and the fundamental understanding of our universe. every day i am left in awe at how much we are able to achieve, and heartbroken over the uncertainty, we see opportunity. and we all feel a profound responsibility to our children and our grandchildren. we have a spirit of innovation here in washington that haswe are not done. [applause] a new world economy is emerging from the depths of this recession, and while its contours and relationships are not fully understood to us, we do know two things, one. with our uniquely powerfu
, there was an election last year. it did not go our way. like you, i understand full well that elections have consequences. the vice president off house is a few houses away from here. i was looking forward to taking on the big challenges. there are two ways to define defeat -- you can deny it or you can choose to learn from it. i choose to learn from it. the way that i see it, our defeat is all the more reason to lay out our vision and lay out specifics with a broader appeal. it will be difficult without a arner in the white house. -- without a partner in the white house. i believe that we can do this. we have to deal with the fact that president obama has a second term. that is the topic of my talk today. a second term will present a lot of new challenges for our side. it will also present a lot of opportunities. we will need something that we occasionally overlook. i would like to explain what that is and why we need it. first, a context. worst term,dent's we argued against big government in theory -- in his first term, we argued against big government in theory. obamacare is no longer a 2
represented for our community in terms of a step forward. we are now elected lgbt peep to office and harvey was such an incredible trail blazer, not? in just getting elected, but in being a great leader and always holding his head high for our community. and i know when i was first sworn into office, one of the things that i always kept in mind was something that i understand harvey to have said, * that when you go into city hall, you walk up the central staircase. you don't walk on one of the side staircases because for our community, it is so important for us to walk up that central staircase and for us to be in the middle of everything and for everyone to know that we are here. and all these years later, we've made a lot of strides in the lgbt community, but we still have so much work to do around hiv issues, around our youth, around discrimination, around transinclusion, and all the things that we know that harvey had he been here today would still be working on and leading on. and, so, we have to keep doing our work. and frankly, we can't take for granted that queer people are going t
. >> brown: then, from tel aviv, margaret warner reports on the israeli elections, as prime minister benjamin netanyahu's party was on track to stay in power by a narrow margin. netanyahu tries to put together, it's sure to include new faces and new agendas that will influence the country. >> ifill: we examine a new study on concussions, showing the impact of hard hits on the brains of living but retired n.f.l. players. >> i go through stages where i think how come i can't remember that and i always wondered are these age-related or are they conclusion related? >> brown: and we mark the 40th anniversary of the "roe v. wade" decision by the supreme court, with a look at the strategies of abortion rights advocates and opponents. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: close to iconic landmarks, to local life, to cultural treasures. it's a feeling that only a river can give you. these are journeys that change your perspective on the world. and perhaps even yourself. viking river cruises. exploring the world in comfort. >> bnsf railway.
. how are elected officials going to take the leadership that is necessary to do that? they have to hear from their constituents. we have to do the training of adults. we have to mobilize them. we have to engage them. we need them to share their experiences with the elected officials and congretional folks. without that engagement, that mobilization, we see so many pieces of legislation dying. >> i wonder, as much as we have to mobilize here, i want to focus on the fact this is an international problem. if you are spewing carbons in new jersey, they cross the border into canada. how do we begin to think of an international focus here? >> it's been a problem for a long time. the u.s. is consuming more than our population. it's affected the rest of the world. now we have problems like india and china are consuming based on an american model. they want what we want and they want to do it the way we did it. that means that you can't have any sort of climate agreement without everyone coming to the table. republicans used that as an excuse to do nothing. china is doing nothing -- no, it doesn
that republicans should whine about. he did win the election he's entitled to try this very liberal strategy and see if it succeeds for him and if it's the way to get his agenda through. i tend to have my doubts. we're all going to find out. >> brown: rev. hamilton, by your role you get involved in all the social issues of our time. did you hear the president making a kind of aggressionive statement about, "this is the way forward for all of us" or did you hear him reaching out to embrace people, to help create that? >> i think it's a great question. i wish he had done more to reach out. in fact that was the point of my message today at the national cathedral was to say, you know, we need a new american vision that's not just democratic or not just republican. it has to be a new vision that brings people together. if we had a new vision with key strategic goals that republicans and democrats have crafted together and say this is what we're going to work together over the next ten years, it would have a huge impact on bringing americans together. i wish that he had done more of that >> brown:
on the heels of last year's election in which president obama won seven of every ten hispanic votes in his victory over republican mitt romney. senator john mccain of arizona said that's the key reason his party must now get on board. >> elections. elections. the republican party is losing the support of our hispanic citizens. and we realize that there are many issues in which we think we are in agreement with our hispanic citizens, but this is a preeminent issue with those citizens. >> ifill: mccain also said the country cannot continue to deny citizenship to children brought to the u.s. illegally. president obama has said immigration reform is at the top of his second term agenda. today his spokesman jay carney welcomed the senate agreement. >> this is a big deal. this is an important development. this is in keeping with the principles the president has been espousing for a long time, in keeping with bipartisan efforts in the past, and with the effort this president believes has to end in a law that he can sign. >> ifill: mr. obama is scheduled to unveil his own ideas on immigration refo
of last year's election in which president obama won seven of every ten hispanic votes in his victory over republican mitt romney. senator john mccain of arizona said that's the key reason his party must now get on board. >> elections. elections. the republican party is losing the support of our hispanic citizens. and we realize that there are many issues in which we think we are in agreement with our hispanic citizens, but this is a preeminent issue with those citizens. >> ifill: mccain also said the country cannot continue to deny citizenship to children brought to the u.s. illegally. president obama has said immigration reform is at the top of his second term agenda. today his spokesman jay carney welcomed the senate agreement. >> this is a big deal. this is an important development. this is in keeping with the principles the president has been espousing for a long time in keeping with bipartisan efforts in the past, and with the effort this president believes has to end in a law that he can sign. >> ifill: mr. obama is scheduled to unveil his own ideas on immigration reform tomorrow in
-than-expected showing in tuesday's elections. near-final totals showed his bloc and its allies had only 60 of 120 seats in parliament. netanyahu signaled he'll reach out to a new centrist party that made a strong showing. it favors a new focus on making peace with the palestinians. this was election day in jordan. voters cast ballots in the country's first parliamentary elections since the arab spring. the new legislature will have more power, including the ability to choose the next prime minister. some two million people were eligible to go to the polls. turnout estimates varied from a high of 56% to as low as 47% as the day went on. several islamist groups boycotted, saying the election was stacked against them. but the prime minister dismissed their actions. >> ( translated ): the weakness of the turnout, if it exists, and i am not saying that, nobody should think that it is because of the boycott. it is not correct. otherwise anyone would think if there was any hesitation for the elections it's because people were neither convinced with past elections nor with the performance of the past parliamen
the racial progress our society has made, on the civil rights movement to the re- election of president obama, the pervasive association with black people and the ghetto betrays a persistent cultural lag. it has been two generation since .chools were desegregated if till were alive today, would remember stories of lynchings peppering the "new york times." he would remember the william man -- million -man march. a black man became president of the united states. he would have been 73 had he lived. thank you. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> we have been joined by taylor branch. i will just let you know that we have been speaking. douglas blackmon spoke. elijah anderson spoke. i would invite you to the podium and talk about the attempted second emancipation proclamation. ladies and gentlemen, taylor branch. [applause] >> thank you. thanks, paul. i don't want to pay tribute to the marc commuter line. i was only on for two extra hours. i am glad to be here. i want to pay tribute to the " washington month
and bus ride. and started selling tickets before election day >> there's nothing like being here. i mean i could watch it on television or i could sit in one of the buildings around here and probably look out at it. it's nothing like being in there. kind of like swimming. you can think about the swimming but if you're not in the pool you really can't feel it. >> suarez: for many we spoke to, it wasn't just history but this president that brought them to washington >> we don't think we've had a president like him before or will have one in my lifetime. so it's worth it to be here to pay homage to him and to his beautiful family and to the country that elected him and to the people who elected him. we're just delighted to be a part of this. >> this is history in the making. first of all from an historical perspective who wouldn't want to be here? but more importantly for me, the whole of the obama administration is everything that i hold dear >> suarez: margaret came up with her family from north carolina. for her a second inauguration for the first black president was no less exciting, no l
be more tkeufpbt it turned out t difficult it turned out to be. it was a narrow election. he has that ahead of him. not to mention the things that haunt a second term which none of us can imagine today. >> you can see former president clinton and secretary of state clinton. who is going to be testifying before congress in a less friendly atmosphere later this week. i was reading obama's first inaugural address today, because i thought, you know, let's get a sense of what it is that he said four years ago. i want to read you two lines. on this day we come to proclaim an end to the petty grievances and falls promises the recriminations and warn out doug mas that for far too long have strangled our politics. that is an incomplete at best. not all the president's fault but also counterparts on capitol hill. but we are still strangled by that kind of division. talking about national security and the global war on terror, we reject as false the choice between our safety and our ideals. that was part of the promise he was going to make to shut down guantanamo, to end enhanced interrogat
with everything even though they have a bad rating, it doesn't affect their chance of being re-elected. unfortunately, they have been stacking in state legislatures and in the house of representatives, all of these anti-choice laws that are every egregious wiggle they can come in. none of them, by the way would stand up against roe v. wade because there are so many price of concerns in the fetal heart beat bill. they're adding things like she has to be taped listening to it. the fact she's in the office being scrutinized or filmed while she's getting a medical procedure or -- >> it is a violation of privacy. >> hal: it is absurd. >> they do things even so much as -- i don't know if it's law necessarily or if it's just the doctor's preference to find out how far along the woman is but they'll have you get a sonogram and that can be traumatic. >> yeah. >> just making that decision, having to see what is growing at that moment can be traumatic for a woman. unless you're in that position, it is inappropriate for someone to make that change on your behalf. >> hal: i believe that to be the g
after tuesday's election. the contest saw a surprisingly strong showing from a centrist party led by a former television personality. margaret warner is in jerusalem. i spoke with her a short time ago. >> so margaret, a few days after the election what kind of government seems to be taking shape? >> jeff, i'm told that bebenetanyahu is trying to put together a very broad coalition, not relying just on the trawl religious and ultra conservative and settler movement crowd that is in his current government. so he is working with that surprise second place finisher to try to put together a very big coalition as well. a lot more votes than they really need. would if the people they're talking about join the government really span a range of viewpoints on everything from how to improve economic conditions for the middle class to say restarting peace talks with the principles. but it will take-- it could take a month to actually firm up. >> tell us a little bit about that surprise second place finisher because it really was a surprise, did get a lot of attention in the leadup. >> warner:
to not comment between the election and inauguration because i wanted to see what kind of president we are looking at here. what kind of path he was putting his administration on, and all of the statements and comments lead me to my he is thinking more of a political conquest than political compromise. >> we will have more on that in just a moment. >>> also, a big week ahead in washington. hillary clinton set to step down as secretary of state this week and the gnat will hold a hearing on kerry to replace her. meantime in a new interview with the new republic president obama says gun control advocates need to listen to their opponents and understand and respect the tradition of hunting. he added that he enjoys skeet shooting at camp david. president weighed in on the dangers of football. they have been making headlines lately. he said if he had son he is not sure he would let his son play football. head over to the white house right now. peter alexander, some interesting stuff in that interview the president gave the new pacific republic, not just football and skeet shooting. >> that's
of the strength of how his legacy will continue it will actually be the 2016 election that will tell us. if you look at history only if a person of the same party is elected after that to turn president that the policies of that present a continue to get in grain and truly part of the cultural fabric. the republican is elected in 2016 you will see some dismantling of certain things. the saw with george bush after ronald reagan. it does not happen very often in history. there's not much of a crowd left at all. matter where you figure in politically you cannot argue that president obama is an incredible writer an incredible speaker. very much appreciated around these parts. folks now moving on to the next stage of this. it is along pennsylvania avenue. the parade they're looking forward to. the first family finishes that quick lunch. about 45 minutes. all of that food that is making me so hungry earlier in our coverage. they arrived very early this morning. kind of like we did here at the national mall for our coverage. they brought along with them some young people from around chicago. that is
are not about him. >> what we're celebrating is not the election or swearing in of a president. we're doing celebrate aring each other. >> reporter: and he talked about the most significant of the weekend, he talks about his wife's haircut. >> i love her bangs. she looks good. she always looks good. >> reporter: and it won't end until late monday night when they attend three different ball. and more than a couple hours away before the ceremonies begin. president obama is only the 17 17th president to have a second inaugural. alternate the u.s. capitol, susan mcginnis, back to you. >> thank you so much. and of course cbs news will provide live coverage of today's inauguration festivities, it begins on cbs 5 and will run until 1 in the afternoon and no noon newscast today. cbs 5 will have reports from christin ayers in washington in the next half hour and during our 5 and 6:00 newscasts this evening. >>> it's 42 lovely degrees in washington right now. >> it's so cold there. >> chilly out there. chilly around the bay area. we have numbers around the 20s
program. president roosevelt was elected four terms. president obama got the virtue of january 20th landing on a sunday and chief justice roberts flubbing the oath in 2009. he used a note card yesterday. probably will use it today, shepard. shepard: justice sotomayor you saw. a funny story from last night. i flown in from turks and caicos for a quick vacation and taking a delta flight from kennedy. it was supposed to take off at 8:30. there were big mechanical problems. they were towing it from the gate. the toe bar got caught underneath the plane. it might have been me and my colleagues on the flight it might have stayed there. in front of me a lady was talking to the marshals as she called them if there was another way or train to get to washington. just happened it was justice sotomayor. someone from the plane said, your honor, we will get you there. and, indeed they did. justice sotomayor, to deliver the fourth inaugural swearing in today here at the capitol. doug mckelway, our correspondent from d.c. on the parade route from freedom plaza. how is the view there? >> reporter: sh
was elected to the board of supervisors in 2008 and reelected in 2010. we will get to know her and talk about the toughest issues facing the city. welcome, supervisor. thank you for joining us. let's start by talking about your background -- where you grew up, what kinds of jobs you have work. supervisor chu: my parents immigrated to the united states about 30 years ago, and i would say that is probably the most formative part of my background. growing up in an immigrant family, you learn many things. my parents raised me in southern california, and i grew up in the restaurant business. they had a small restaurant at the time, and i was there every weekend, working -- well, not working, eating. having a fried egg roll, wanton, something good. it taught me the value of working hard and what it meant to be part of a small business, a small business -- a small business, small family, and an immigrant family at that. really being impacted by the los angeles riots, when that occurred, put me on the path toward public policy and understanding what it meant to have opportunities and not have opportu
, and they're not totally in love with his first term. he just beat his rival in the election. >> people have lower expectations, so i think we're going to -- he may try and raise that a little bit. this will be a lot of poetry, and the state of the union address is going to be the prose where he really lays out the agenda. >> let's bring in the auth aror the book "barack obama the story" and margaret hoover, republican consultant and cnn contributor. david, what are you expecting to hear? >> i think there's a paradox here, which is that four years ago there were huge crowds and so much ebullience of the moment. he gave such a wintry speech. today there's smaller crowds, i think he's giving a more optimistic speech. i think he feels he's in a much better place today than he was four years ago? >> cornell? >> i think we'll hear some of the things picked up from the campaign. he's got to talk about the economy, talk about the number one issue to americans, and that's jobs and expanding and growing the middle class. we're looking at a middle class that continues to shrink, and it's something tha
a moment to sign a postcard, and we will make sure that they are delivered to the desks of your elected representatives. next, i have the great privilege and distinct honor of introducing the new president of nee march for life, jeanni monahan. she has worked to build a culture of life throughout the course of her professional career. that has included roles in the field of public policy, and both the government and in a think tank. if you ask her, she will tell you that she is excited and humbled to now be president of the organization that brings together people of all ages, of all faiths, and of all walks of life, for what has become the largest and most important civil rights protest in the world. [applause] please join me in welcoming the new president of the march for life, jeanne monahan. [applause] >> thank you. is anybody cold out there? [laughter] it is a little chilly, right? is ok. we are here for a pretty important cause, right? [applause]i can't. . hear you. [applause] today marks a somber moment in our country's history. we remember that 55 million americans have died as
business. he never had a single election not even for stink -- a student council. governor? [applause] in keeping with the discussion, he is keen on innovation and things of that nature. i know that will come out. thank you, governor. >> are we all set? i am from the "mercury news," and we're here because we live in a global cloueconomy. it has altered local economies because so many manufacturing and technology jobs are moving, whether it is a matter of costs for going where the trained work force is. we're fortunate to have to governors here to talk about how that change affects their jobs and what they're doing to jump- start their economies which compete with one another. this could be fun. let me start with our guest. governor hickenlooper. i knew that was going to happen. most of us here are pretty much aware of california's budget crisis. can you give us a quick briefing on where colorado is and what you are trying to do to turn things around? >> our budget is just as dressed as almost every state in the country. we have been working trying to control costs, get our pension fun
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 86 (some duplicates have been removed)